Pegging climbing roses

I have a Zeph that has finally has gotten big. She is in a rather confined space between steps and a hydrangea. I am thinking pegging will help those canes that don’t get tied to the trellis on the column.

I pegged several roses in San Antonio and Zepherine was one of them. My roses tended to get leggier there because of the extra water and linger growing season. I’ve pegged to ground and pegged to self. I was enjoying creating unusual orbs and obelisks.

I tried pegging for the first time (to the ground) last year with an “accidental” rose bred by Paul Barden a few years ago. It’s called Sugar Jangle and seems particularly suited to pegging because of long lax canes. It’s doing very well - can hardly wait to see it a few years from now!

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I have not tried pegging - can you tell me how and when to do it?

When I’ve pegged canes they have been fast growing, long and flexible.
If you can bend a cane to the ground that is the simplest way. Take the end to the ground and use a landscape staple about six inches from the end and secure it forming an arch, balloon or even back close to the origin. Occasionally the pegged end will root where pegged but not always.
Another way to do it is similar to how you make horizontal canes for a climber. You can make canes orbit the bush. Tying the cane to another older cane on the bush.
Both techniques will produce more blooms off the horizontal canes.
Best idea for leggy roses where you don’t have a structure to climb or support.
You can google pegging to see some fantastic illustrations.
Good luck and let me know how it goes if you try it!

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If I peg a climbing rose and later decide to put it on a structure, is that a difficult transition or just a slow one while I wait for new growth to tie to the structure? I just did one last year because I cannot afford a trellis at the moment and I like the way it looks.

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